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Friday, December 14, 2018

More Molds, More Progress

I've just complete my first visit to Ta Shing Yacht Builders in Tainan, Taiwan.  I'll spare the travelog, and just say I really like Taiwan, and Ta Shing's hospitality is second to none.  Thank you Ta Shing!!

Progress continues molding other parts of the boat.  The hull that we followed in the last blog entry covered the creation of the hull, but that's just the beginning of the structural components.

Next up is the main deck, and the pictures below show the mold being prepared.  It's upside down, so a bit confusing to look at.   In the picture immediately below, the section that the guy is standing on is the cockpit.  He's standing on the floor, but on the underside.  To the right is the salon, so all of what you see are the salon walls and the walkway around to the forward deck.


Deck mold, including cockpit and salon

Next below is the fore deck, and is all part of the same mold. The boxes standing up are the openings for the overhead hatches, and the two round outlines forward are the openings for the Freeman hatches to access the chain locker.

Fore deck mold

Fast forward, and below you can see the same mold, now laminated with gobs of fiberglass, and stiffener being laminated in.

Laminated deck

Meanwhile, things are progressing in the main hull.  The plywood partitions form the compartment where the black and gray water tanks will live.

Partitions for black and gray water tanks compartments
Over the days I was at the yard, the tanks got placed, and additional stringers are being laminated in to form the base for the floor in this area.

Black and gray water tanks in place

The main and wing engines are on hand and will get set in place pretty soon to ensure proper placement and alignment.  Below is the wing engine, including the clutched PTO (power take-off) on the front for driving the hydraulic pump.  Although the hydraulics won't load it fully, the PTO is capable of delivering full engine power.  The engine is a Deere 4045AFM85, rated at 160hp (120kw) continuous output, and the gear to drive the folding wing prop is a ZF 85-IV vee-drive

Deere 4045 wing engine with clutched PTO

Deere 4045 with ZF vee-drive

The main engine is a Scania DI-13 80M.  It's a 6 cylinder, 13 liter engine rated at 400hp (295kw) at 1800 rpm, continuous duty.  The gear is a Twin Disc MGX-5114-DC with a 3.43:1 gear reduction.


Scania DI-13 with Twin Disc gear

One nice feature of the Scania is that it supports 500 hr oil change intervals, in part because of the built in oil centrifuge.

Oil cleaning centrifuge

Scania DI-13

One of our options for the engine is a dual alternator configuration using large frame, pad-mounted Leese Neville alternators.  Each alternator can produce 200A at 24V.

Dual alternators

9 comments:

  1. Beautiful progress, especially liking the nice shiny engines!

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  2. Great Project!
    Surprised to see and engine brand I have never seen. What's the backstory on the Scania engine selected?

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  3. Very nice, i'm with Quiet Captain more info on the engine choice please.

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  4. Peter, I love the Scania. Any reason you chose Deere for the wing and not a "baby" Scania ?

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  5. I'll do a whole post on the engine decision. Stay tuned.

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  6. So glad someone beat me to asking why scania instead of a deere/lugger engine...!

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    1. Oh and i presume the 2 beast of alternators will remove virtually all need to run the genset while underway? With a decent charger/invertor setup you should be able to have full ac demand taken care of..?

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  7. I had a D8 Scania in a salmon troller years ago, also with an oil centrifuge. Cleaning out that hard, caked on oil debris from the centrifuge walls wore thin after short while. I thought that there were disposable liners that you could insert (like paper coffee filters) but I was never able to source them. Mind you, in those days I was pretty light on experience, so maybe I was doing it the hard way, as no one showed me a better way to do it.

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